KOMAI AN INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL JAPANESE PDF

It was a father of Otojiro Komai and a gradfather of Seibei Komai who in originated a form of damascene or Japaneze Zogan used to ornament and decorate swords, guns, daggers and various types of sword furniture. With the major changes brought about by the Meiji restoration beginning of and a Haitorei Edict March , the Japanese were no longer allowed to wear swords, so the Komai family, like many others, had to find another form of livelihood. They applied their damascene craft inlaid work of gold and silver on iron ware to creating objects in Western and traditional Japanese styles producing vases, purses, cigar, cigarette and card cases, jewelry boxes, coat buttons, combs, buckles, incense burners, hanging plates, lockets, brooches, charms, spoons, bracelets, cabinets and others. Around Komai Otojiro started selling damascened ironwares in Kobe, a centre of foreign trade, and within a few years his chargers, plaques, cabinets, model pagodas, and vases were in such demand that he was prosperous enough to buy a large house. Store of Otojiro Komai, Kyoto.

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It is also one of only two rules along with the geminate rule that create ambiguity for the reader excluding the exceptions listed above for the H-row rule. Gemination can occur in Japanese for a variety of reasons.

However, in Sino-Japanese words, geminate consonants are produced by different, more regular processes, and the historical usage for these words reflects historical pronunciations. While this usage does reflect a historical pronunciation, it, like the Y-row rule, produces ambiguity. Furthermore, since these vowels are elided in some compounds but not others, this usage obscures the difference in a way that is essentially impossible to predict.

While there are a few other processes that can cause geminates in Sino-Japanese words, they all apply to N- and M-row kana, and are not written differently in historical and modern kana. Those fronted with the palatal glide are described in the Y-row rule, but Early Middle Japanese also introduced consonants fronted with labial glides i. These were far more limited in range than their palatal counterparts, however, affecting only the K- and G- rows.

Nevertheless, some classical texts may indicate the other differences, and some resources will refer to them, so it is useful to be familiar with them. This rule applies exclusively to Sino-Japanese words. There are no known exceptions to this rule, but some dialects such as the Kagoshima dialect preserve the distinction. Syllable final nasals are believed by many scholars to have existed in Proto-Japonic, but all agree that they were lost by the time of Old Japanese.

They first re-appeared in Early Middle Japanese, with the introduction of Middle Chinese loanwords ending in -n and -m. Originally, syllabic n and m were phonemically and phonologically distinct, although the distinction was never written down, and was lost by Early Modern Japanese. This happens exceedingly rarely, and usually results from sound elision.

An exhaustive list of every example out of all regular-use characters with the syllabic nasal in their native Japanese readings numbers only 13 characters 0. There is one exception.

Miscellaneous[ edit ] Two other significant differences involve the way that kana are used in general, rather than which kana are used.

Ruby text is still widely used in modern Japanese, but only for characters with non-standard or ambiguous pronunciations, or sometimes in materials designed for children or foreigners. Finally, kana iteration marks were far more common in classical Japanese, and sometimes used in ways that are considered completely obsolete in modern Japanese. For an example of a major document written in the classical style, see as an example the original text of the Meiji Constitution , which is written in classical Japanese using historical kana, old character forms, kana iteration marks, and Katakana in place of Hiragana although it lacks universal ruby text.

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Classical Japanese

It is also one of only two rules along with the geminate rule that create ambiguity for the reader excluding the exceptions listed above for the H-row rule. Gemination can occur in Japanese for a variety of reasons. However, in Sino-Japanese words, geminate consonants are produced by different, more regular processes, and the historical usage for these words reflects historical pronunciations. While this usage does reflect a historical pronunciation, it, like the Y-row rule, produces ambiguity. Furthermore, since these vowels are elided in some compounds but not others, this usage obscures the difference in a way that is essentially impossible to predict. While there are a few other processes that can cause geminates in Sino-Japanese words, they all apply to N- and M-row kana, and are not written differently in historical and modern kana.

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An introduction to Classical Japanese (Komai).pdf

Dukazahn Skip to content Skip to search. An Introduction to Japanese Documents. An Introduction to Classical Fascia? These 4 locations in All: The University of Melbourne.

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