ABANDONED FARMHOUSE BY TED KOOSER PDF

Email this page Courtesy of Blue Flower Arts Ted Kooser is known for his poetry and essays that celebrate the quotidian and capture a vanishing way of life. The aim of the program is to raise the visibility of poetry. In short, I want to show people how interesting the ordinary world can be if you pay attention. His style is accomplished but extremely simple—his diction drawn from common speech, his syntax conversational. His subjects are chosen from the everyday world of the Great Plains, and his sensibility, though more subtle and articulate, is that of the average Midwesterner.

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Abandoned Farmhouse - Poem by Ted Kooser Autoplay next video He was a big man, says the size of his shoes on a pile of broken dishes by the house; a tall man too, says the length of the bed in an upstairs room; and a good, God-fearing man, says the Bible with a broken back on the floor below the window, dusty with sun; but not a man for farming, say the fields cluttered with boulders and the leaky barn. A woman lived with him, says the bedroom wall papered with lilacs and the kitchen shelves covered with oilcloth, and they had a child, says the sandbox made from a tractor tire.

Money was scarce, say the jars of plum preserves and canned tomatoes sealed in the cellar hole. And the winters cold, say the rags in the window frames.

It was lonely here, says the narrow country road. Something went wrong, says the empty house in the weed-choked yard. Stones in the fields say he was not a farmer; the still-sealed jars in the cellar say she left in a nervous haste. And the child? Its toys are strewn in the yard like branches after a storm—a rubber cow, a rusty tractor with a broken plow, a doll in overalls. Something went wrong, they say.

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Analysis of Poem "Abandoned Farmhouse" by Ted Kooser

He was a big man, says the size of his shoes on a pile of broken dishes by the house; a tall man too, says the length of the bed in an upstairs room; and a good, God-fearing man, says the Bible with a broken back on the floor below the window, dusty with sun; but not a man for farming, say the fields cluttered with boulders and the leaky barn. A woman lived with him, says the bedroom wall papered with lilacs and the kitchen shelves covered with oilcloth, and they had a child, says the sandbox made from a tractor tire. Money was scarce, say the jars of plum preserves and canned tomatoes sealed in the cellar hole. And the winters cold, say the rags in the window frames. It was lonely here, says the narrow country road.

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Exploring Ted Kooser’s “Abandoned Farmhouse”

She also spent several years as a teacher consultant for the Illinois State Writing Project. You can reach her at annkellycox gmail. The poem works well for a couple of reasons: It dispels two myths that my students often believe—that poetry is difficult to understand, and that poetry must rhyme. It is deceptively simple. Students find the poem easy to comprehend, but as they discuss the piece in more detail, they can discover elements such as personification, figurative language, diction, and repetition. I like to begin this lesson by projecting the photo below. Ask students to examine the objects in the room, then make inferences about what type of person resides here.

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Abandoned Farmhouse

Ted Kooser Source Ted Kooser And A Summary of Abandoned Farmhouse Abandoned Farmhouse is a poem that relies on repeated personification and the language of abandonment to create an eerie, mysterious atmosphere. The reader is left asking questions, pondering on the whys and wherefores of such an absence. Ted Kooser is a poet of the Midwest and tends to focus in on such subjects as family, love, place and sense of time. Many of his poems are rooted in the past or are works of precise observation.

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